Making Glass Cabochon Tiles

In this post I am going to explain a bit how I made the glass tiles for my game Chromonome. I’m not planning to publish it, so I’m not taking into account production costs as if it was meant to go for mass production. Still I found the glass tiles with printed image to be a relatively cheap solution with the biggest drawback being the amount of time it takes to craft big quantities of them. If you like the result and you would like to do something similar for your game with smaller quantities of pieces it would be totally recommendable.

You have more details about the game in this Post.
You have a print and play version in this Post.

Why going for Glass Tiles

I’ve tried to put some focus on the sensorial aspect of this game, I wanted it to feel mechanically rewarding to the senses and the key element couldn’t be other than the tiles that are used for playing. I wanted them to be pleasing to the eye and to the touch.

The four types of cells.

Also, in earlier tests I made with edge-matching tile games there was a problem that constantly emerged. Whenever someone placed a tile in contact with another tile, the whole grid shifted a tiny bit, mostly if that someone was a kid, and after several moves everything was annoyingly disarrayed.

I found out that the glass tiles are a good solution for everything I wanted:

  • They are very nice to the touch, they’re smooth and their weight feels just right in your hands.
  • They enhance the visuals of the print below them beyond what a regular coating could do.
  • Their weight prevents the whole matrix from shifting
  • Their smooth curvature allows you to just drop one piece between two others and have it matching (which is lovely, because that tends to happen in decisive moments of the game).
  • They are not THAT expensive, though it does take a reasonable amount of time to prepare a set of 118 tiles.

Continue to the next page if you want to know what materials to use or go to the last page to know directly about the process.

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